Customer Care Training Rule Number One: First, Do No Harm

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You may have heard the Latin phrase, Primum non nocere, which means “first, do no harm.” Although it’s often associated with the physician’s Hippocratic Oath, the original oath does not include the precise phrase. It is, however, taught in medical schools as part of medical ethics classes and it has an important connotation for those of us who serve end-users and other customers.

customer care training

But, I Didn’t Think I Was Being Rude! (Why Your Customers Might Think You’re Rude When You’re Not)

I recently had a conversation with a client who told me he sometimes hears complaints from his end-users that he’s being rude. He told me that he didn’t feel like he was being rude at all.

I doubt he was being rude, but I suspect he maintains a “strictly-business” demeanor around the office. I’ve noticed in our email exchanges and phone calls that his responses to me are terse and strictly-business with no trace of humanness. He’s really beyond formal, in that his emails don’t even include a greeting (“Hi Don” or “Dear Don”), a complimentary close (“Kind regards” or “Sincerely”), or even an email signature. I noticed in our phone conversations that he didn’t initiate any sort of attempt to connect with me as one person to another. Of course, I’m seen as a vendor and sometimes treated differently from, say, co-workers. Still, I wonder if a clue to his problem with end-users might be found in the way he interacted with me.

Made a Mistake at Work? It’s Okay! (Includes Video)

When you think of grace, what comes to mind? Perhaps it’s the fluid movements of a beautiful ballet. Maybe you think of the words of appreciation expressed before a meal. Another form of grace is unmerited divine assistance given to us. Whether you believe in religious teachings or not, I’m convinced that graces exists and I’m really glad of that! Hear me out.

made a mistake at work

How to Be a Better Conversationalist: Are Your Conversations Cooperative?

When we’re talking with an end-user or a customer, we want to ensure our conversations are effective, that they make good use of our time and that of our customer or end-user. One way to ensure that conversations are effective is to ensure they are cooperative, a process of give-and-take. Paul Grice was a professor at the University of California at Berkeley and a philosopher of language who identified four maxims of conversation that describe the elements of successful conversation.

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Online Customer Service Training That Gets Results

Give your IT team the skills they need to serve customers at the highest level. All while improving productivity and creating a culture of compassion.

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